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In This Issue:

General Updates

CRRC Welcomes 2008-2009 Board of Directors

CRRC Celebrates 10 Years!

Thank you Polyglass USA!

CRRC Becomes an ANSI-Accredited Standards Developer

Planning for the Future: CRRC Launches a Strategic Planning Process

Technical Update

High Profile Metal Products

Field-Applied Coating Thickness

Ongoing Technical Issues

Ratings, Codes and Programs

USGBC LEED 2009

A Look at Green Product Certification Programs and Resources

Membership and Outreach

CRRC Annual Membership Meeting Recap

CRRC Signs at Tradeshows

General Updates

CRRC Welcomes 2008-2009 Board of Directors

The CRRC’s new Board of Directors assembled in Las Vegas on June 10, following the spring election where members voted to reelect Marty Hastings, Valspar and elected Matt Kolb, National Coatings. The Board elected Rich Lee, Momentum Technologies, to serve as Chairman, and Mike Ennis as Vice Chairman. Greg Crawford, American Iron and Steel Institute, and Marty Hastings will continue to serve as Secretary and Treasurer, respectively. The full list of Board Members can be seen at: coolroofs.org/aboutthecrrc_boardofdirectors.html.

David Cocuzzi, AKZO Nobel, and Peter Turnbull, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, retired from the Board, each after serving multiple terms. Thank you David and Peter for all of your hard work and dedication! 

CRRC Celebrates 10 Years!

The CRRC celebrated its 10-Year Anniversary on June 10, in conjunction with our Annual Membership Meeting in Las Vegas. The CRRC recognized the contributions of all of the people and companies who helped found the organization and make it what it is today. From the signatories of the Articles of Incorporation to the current Technical Committee, the CRRC has always depended on the generosity and support of its participants.

In particular, the CRRC recognized all the Board Members who have served multiple terms, including: Hashem Akbari (LBNL), Paul Beemer (Henry Company), Ed Betker (Roof Evaluation/ RCI), David Cocuzzi (AKZO Nobel), Andre Desjarlais (ORNL), Bill Kirn (National Coatings), David Hitchcock (Houston Advanced Research Center), Jonathan Humble (American Iron and Steel Institute), Marc LaFrance (US DOE), Dave Roodvoets (formerly SPRI, currently DLR Consultants), Rachel Schmeltz (US EPA), and Peter Turnbull (PG&E). The CRRC also recognized our Accredited Testing Laboratories for making the Rating Program possible and providing an important interface with the CRRC’s Licensees.

Here’s to another 10 years!

Thank you Polyglass USA!

A very special thanks to Polyglass USA for sponsoring our 10 Year Anniversary Celebration in Las Vegas! We had a wonderful celebration evening including food, drinks, and an awards ceremony, all while keeping it cool with our special CRRC shades!

CRRC Becomes an ANSI-Accredited Standards Developer

The CRRC is happy to announce that the organization has achieved accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as an Accredited Standards Developer. ANSI is a distinguished non-profit organization that coordinates the development of voluntary consensus standards through its Essential Requirements, which require the process for standards development to be fair, open, and balanced.

Now that the CRRC has earned its ‘Accredited Standards Developer’ status, the CRRC-1 Standard for rating the radiative properties of roofing materials will undergo a Consensus Body review in order to be submitted to ANSI to become an American National Standard. If you are interesting in joining the Consensus Body, please contact Stephanie Stern at stephanie@coolroofs.org.

Planning for the Future: CRRC Launches a Strategic Planning Process

After ten years of existence, it is time to plan the next ten; the CRRC Board of Directors is launching a strategic planning process to develop a 10-year plan for the organization. This plan will map out where the organization should focus its outreach efforts and technical development.

In preparation for the planning process, the CRRC conducted a survey of its participants and other stakeholders. In general, responses were positive: 100% of members responded that their membership is somewhat or very beneficial and one participant wrote, "The visibility of our company and products are greatly enhanced."

Technical Update

High Profile Metal Products

In 2006, LBNL conducted a study showing that roofing products with a high vertical profile have a lower solar reflectance than the same material in a flat sheet. The Cool Metal Roofing Coalition gathered more detail regarding profiled metal products. This data showed that for three of the four product types examined, the profile did not significantly affect the solar reflectance. Following the recommendation of the Technical Committee, the Board voted to add language to CRRC-1 which allows three types of metal roofing products examined in the study (standing seam, modular or tile shingle, and agricultural panel) to be rated using flat samples of the same material, with no penalty for their profile.

Field-Applied Coating Thickness

The Board of Directors voted to increase the tolerance for field-applied coating thickness of test samples from 10% to 20% plus or minus the manufacturer specified minimum. The previous requirement of 10% was causing an unreasonable number of test samples to be rejected by Accredited Testing Laboratories. Now, upon initial product testing, field-applied coatings are required to be applied at the manufacturer’s minimum recommended thickness, +/- 20%.

Ongoing Technical Issues

The CRRC is wrestling with a number of important technical issues in various stages of research and development, summarized below. The Technical Committee will next meet on November 17 in Boston, MA.

Single Ply Product Thickness: The Technical Committee is considering adding a requirement that the thickness of single ply products be measured, in order to confirm that the proper thickness is used for a compound rating that covers multiple thicknesses.

Proposal for Rating of Composite Shingles: The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) proposed that the CRRC allow blended color shingles to be rated using a weighted average of monocolor shingle ratings. This proposal is based on research conducted by LBNL and 3M. ARMA will collect more data and further refine its proposal for the next meeting.

Devices & Services (D&S) Reflectometer: Mr. Ronnen Levinson of LBNL and Mr. Charlie Moore of D&S have been working to resolve a reported error in the red sensor of the D&S reflectometer used to perform ASTM C1549. LBNL data shows that this error, in certain circumstances, caused an average difference in measured solar reflectance of about 0.015. D&S plans to offer an upgrade to fix the sensor, which will cost about $2,500 and should be available some time this year. The Cool Metal Roofing Coalition has also collected data, which suggests that there is no error with the reflectometer. The Technical Committee will continue to consider this issue.

Solar Spectra for Solar Reflectance: Mr. Levinson presented a proposal to the Technical Committee in April recommending that the solar spectral standard used in ASTM test methods E903 and C1549 be changed from E891 Direct to a modification of G173 Global. Mr. Levinson stated that the proposed spectrum is more suited to measuring the solar reflectance of roofing materials because it includes both direct and diffuse sunlight and assumes an incident angle more consistent with roofing products. Staff is currently waiting on an outside review of the proposal before bringing it back to the Technical Committee in the fall.

Ratings, Codes and Programs

USGBC LEED 2009

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) program is a green building rating program administered by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). This year the USGBC is unveiling a new version of the program, LEED 2009, which makes changes to both individual LEED credits and the overall program structure, including:

The Point System: LEED 2009 includes a complex and formal process for evaluating the impact, and therefore the point value, of each credit and the total number of possible points has been raised to 100. The result of this point re-distribution is that some credits increased in relative importance while other credits have declined.

Regional Credits: LEED 2009 includes four Regional Credits, each worth one point above and beyond the 100 rated points. The requirements for each Regional Credit will be determined by local USGBC chapters to meet the specific environmental needs of the region. Drafts of these credits have not yet been released.

Standardization of Credits: One goal of this revision is to standardize credits across all the different certification types (i.e. New Construction, Core and Shell, Commercial Interiors, etc) where possible. Many credits have also been updated to incorporate previous Credit Interpretation Rulings issued to clarify the intent of a given credit.

New Pre-requisites: Some new pre-requisites, minimum requirements that a building must meet for a given environmental area, regardless of the total number of points achieved, have been added to LEED 2009. The increase in pre-requisites ensures that all certified LEED buildings meet some requirements in each environmental area (e.g. energy, water conservation, sustainable sites etc).

What does all this mean for cool roofing? Previous LEED programs included a cool roof credit worth one point, as part of the Sustainable Sites environmental area. In LEED for New Construction, this credit required that at least 75% of the roof use a material above a certain Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) value. LEED 2009 retains this credit, and it is still worth one point. However, as the total number of possible points has increased, the relative importance of this credit has decreased. The new credit also formalizes a provision allowing for a lower SRI if more than 75% of the roof area is covered.

A Look at Green Product Certification Programs and Resources

As demand for ’green’ construction materials grows, a variety of programs and rating systems have developed to provide builders, architects, and consultants with information about products and sources on where to find green products. Here the CRRC gives an overview of the some of the most significant ’green’ certification programs and online directories:

CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS:

Green Seal
Green Seal is an independent, non-profit organization that strives to achieve a healthier and cleaner environment by identifying and promoting products and services that cause less toxic pollution and waste, conserve resources and habitats, and minimize global warming and ozone depletion.

Green Seal’s GS-11 Standard for Paint includes a section for Reflective Roof Coatings. The updated standard will require that coatings have an initial solar reflectance greater than or equal to 0.65 for low-sloped roofing and 0.25, for steep-sloped roofs and a minimum thermal emittance of 0.80. The final revised standard will be issued in the next few months. For more information visit: www.greenseal.org

Cradle to Cradle
Cradle to Cradle Certification certifies products that are made from environmentally safe and healthy materials, designed for material reutilization, such as recycling or composting, uses renewable energy, and efficiently uses energy and water, and institutes strategies for social responsibility.

Products can achieve Silver, Gold or Platinum certification if they meet the requirements. The website has a section of products dedicated to ’Building Exteriors’ in which roof products could be listed. For more information visit: www.mbdc.com/c2c/

ONLINE DIRECTORIES:

Rate It Green
Rate It Green is a user-driven directory, ratings site, and community portal for everyone interested in green building. They facilitate information sharing to support further industry growth and to help increase industry confidence and openness. Their website contains green ratings for products and services, a forum for questions, basic information on green building, and links to green building and related sources. There is a roofing section where users can search by roofing products and services and read other users’ ratings of those products. For more information visit: www.rateitgreen.com

Green Building Pages
Green Building Pages is a sustainable building materials database and design tool for the environmentally and socially responsible designer, builder and client. The site features basic sustainable design information, links and resources, news, events calendar, and case studies. The site also has a green products database that can be browsed by categories including by each LEED point. Users can search the database for products that specifically meet LEED, such as Heat Island Effect- Roof. Companies are added to the website after completing and passing a complete evaluation of a company’s practices and products. For more information visit: www.greenbuildingpages.com

BuildingGreen, LLC
BuildingGreen is an independent publishing company, which provides research, ideas, and writing to its members through publications, including Environmental Building News, the GreenSpec directory of green products, and the BuildingGreen Suite of online tools.

The GreenSpec Directory conducts independent research to ensure that product descriptions contain unbiased, quality information. The directory has a roofing section that divides the products up by roofing type and describes why that product type is ’green’. Some information is available for free, but more detailed information can only be accessed by members who pay annual dues. For more information go to: www.buildinggreen.com

Membership and Outreach

CRRC Annual Membership Meeting Recap

The CRRC held its annual Membership meeting on June 11 in Las Vegas.  The presentations (available at: coolroofs.org/links.html) included:

Ratings, Codes and Standards Update

Mr. Jonathan Humble, American Iron and Steel Institute, presented updates on a number of codes and programs that involve cool roofing, including:

• ASHRAE 90.1: Though currently the cool roof regulation is optional, and allows the building to reduce its insulation, there is a proposal before the 90.1 committee to change the cool roof provision from optional to mandatory, and to expand the applicable climate zones (from zones 1-3 to 1-5). The CRRC is noted as an informational reference.

• ASHRAE 189.1: This new green building standard, which essentially combines ASHRAE 90.1 and the LEED 2.2 New Construction program, relies on the performance approach to compliance. The standard includes cool roof provisions and requires both Solar Reflectance Index and Energy Star building envelope criteria.

Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing

Mr. James Hoff, the Technical Director of the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing, explained that the Center is dedicated to “promoting the development and use of environmentally responsible roof systems.” The Center is a member-supported non-profit based in Washington DC, created to conduct educational programs and advocacy as well as technical research. Mr. Hoff said the organization was formed in response to a belief that government regulators and sustainability program developers are not aware of the importance and impact of roofing.

Title 24 Update

Mr. Payam Bozorgchami, from the California Energy Commission, presented an update on California’s Building Energy Code, or Title 24. Mr. Bozorgchami described the current cool roofing regulations in Title 24 as well as the recently adopted changes to the cool roofing requirements, which are expected to take effect in July 2009.

For the CRRC’s summary of the updates go to: http://coolroofs.org/documents/Title24updatesummary_newsletter.pdf

CRRC Signs at Tradeshows

The CRRC will be making small signs for Licensees to display at tradeshows in order to highlight their CRRC rated products. The sign would be an 18"x 18" foam core board and would be able to be placed anywhere in your tradeshow booth. It would read, "See our CRRC rated products at coolroofs.org."

The CRRC plans to provide each Licensee with one tradeshow sign that would be yours to bring to any tradeshow and keep for future shows. If you would be interested in having a complimentary sign for the upcoming Greenbuild tradeshow in Boston in November 2008, please contact Michelle at michelle@coolroofs.org