In This Issue:

General Updates

Board of Directors Election Underway

June Event Sponsorship

Spring Lab Training

Technical Update

New Test Method E1918A

Technical Committee Meeting Recap

Ratings, Codes and Programs

Title 24 Update

ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for High Performance Green Buildings

Dallas Cool Roof Code


General Updates

Board of Directors Election Underway

Ballots for the 2008 Board of Directors election are out!  All Members in good standing should have received their ballot by email on April 15th.  Please contact us at info@coolroofs.org  if you have not received the ballot or if you are interested in becoming a Member and joining our electoral process. 

We currently have 8 Class A nominees and 1 Class B nominee.  If you have a Class B individual in mind that would be interested in joining the Board of Directors, you are more than welcome to send any referrals to us for the current Board to consider.  Please send considerations to Kathleen@coolroofs.org.  

June Event Sponsorship

This June, in conjunction with the WSRCA conference in Las Vegas, the CRRC will be holding its Annual Membership Meeting and its 10-Year Anniversary Reception! There are opportunities for your company to sponsor these fabulous events to celebrate all of our collective successes over the past ten years.

We expect 100 attendees from all segments of the roofing industry to attend. This is a great opportunity for your company to have targeted sponsorship recognition, as well as to celebrate and support this special milestone with the CRRC.

If you are interested in being a sponsor, please download this application or contact Michelle van Tijen at (510) 482-4420 x246 or michelle@coolroofs.org.

Spring Lab Training

The CRRC held its Lab Training on April 17th at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Lab trainees were trained on the following CRRC test methods: ASTM E903, C1549, C1371, and E1918, as well as the CRRC-1 Test Method 1 and E1918A.   The training went smoothly as participants practiced the various test methods. We thoroughly enjoyed meeting the individuals that came out for the training. 

If you are interested in attending the following CRRC lab training or learning more on what goes on at these training sessions, please contact us at info@coolroofs.org.


Technical Update

New Test Method! E1918A

The CRRC Board of Directors voted to approve E1918A (Alternate) as a CRRC test method for solar reflectance, following the recommendation by the Technical Committee. E1918A is a modification of ASTM E1918, which was developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Like E1918, E1918A uses a pyranometer, however, E1918A compares the reflected solar irradiance from the sample with a reference white mask and black mask, each of known solar reflectance. The solar reflectance of the sample is then calculated using a linear extrapolation based on the measured values from the sample and each mask and the known reflectance values of the masks. The masks essentially normalize for the area surrounding the sample.

The benefit of using E1918A is that the sample need only be one square meter in size, rather than the ten foot by ten foot sample size required by ASTM E1918. The CRRC’s Accredited Testing Laboratories will be conducting a round robin using E1918A to determine the precision and bias of the test method.

Technical Committee Meeting Recap

The CRRC’s Technical Committee met on April 29 at Tremco’s office in Beachwood, Ohio and participants presented and discussed many topics. Key topics included:

High Profile Product Rating

Since the Technical Committee’s last meeting in October 2007, both the Cool Metal Roofing Coalition and the Tile Roofing Institute conducted studies on the effects of product profile on solar reflectance and presented their findings for the consideration of the committee. The metal profiles tested did not show measurable differences between profiled and flat products.  Differences were noted for large profiles common for tile products, as well as other differences related to the reflectance test method used.

Reflectometer Correction

Another significant item for discussion was a possible change to the reflectometer, which is used to measure solar reflectance with ASTM C1549. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been working with Devices and Services to correct a slight error to the reflectometer and to allow it to measure reflectance from global solar irradiance in addition to direct solar irradiance.  The Cool Metal Roofing Coalition also presented reflectometer measurement data they collected.

Field-Applied Coating Thickness Tolerance

The Technical Committee also discussed the tolerance for field-applied coatings thickness measurements, which several testing laboratories have suggested is too stringent. The Technical Committee voted to recommend that the Board change the tolerance from within 10% of the manufacturer’s recommended thickness to a 20% tolerance.

ARMA Proposal for Shingle Rating

A representative from the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) presented a proposal to allow shingle manufacturers to rate their blended shingle products based on an average of ratings for individual granules. ARMA proposed creating an industry database for the solar reflectance and thermal emittance of the granules, which the shingle manufacturers would be able to reference for CRRC rating.  The Technical Committee voted to approve the initial concept; ARMA will continue developing the proposal by conducting further research.

The committee’s recommendations will be shared with the Board at the upcoming June Board Meeting. A huge thank you to Kurt Sosinski for hosting the meeting and to Dave Roodvoets for chairing.


Ratings, Codes and Programs

Title 24 Update

The California Energy Commission held an Adoption Hearing on April 23, 2008 to adopt the 15-Day Language with proposed changes to the Building Energy Efficiency Standards contained in the California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 24. The proposed amended standards will go into effect in 2009.

The changes that will be made to Title 24 in the 2008 update are explained with supporting documents at: http://coolroofs.org/newsletters/winter2008.html#story7.

ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for High Performance Green Buildings

Standard 189.1 for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings, Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, is being developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) in conjunction with the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). This is the first such green building standard in the United States. The 30-day public review draft of the ASHRAE Standard 189.1P is currently available online.

This version of the standard includes cool roof requirements in climate zones 1, 2, and 3 which require either a minimum Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) value (78 for low-slope and 29 for steep-slope) or Energy Star rating. The CRRC submitted comments in July 2007 suggesting that the standard include a reference to the CRRC's program and they did include this reference. The standard requires that solar reflectance and thermal emittance values for the calculation of SRI “be determined by a laboratory accredited by a nationally recognized accreditation organization, such as the Cool Roof Rating Council CRRC-1 Product Rating Program, and shall be labeled and certified by the manufacturer.”

Comments on the 30-day public review draft were accepted by ASHRAE until May 5, 2008. For more information on this standard, please visit: www.ashrae.org/technology/page/331

Dallas Cool Roof Code

On April 9th, 2008, Dallas City Council unanimously adopted a green construction ordinance aimed at reducing energy and water consumption in all new houses and commercial buildings. It is a comprehensive building standard for both residential and commercial construction.

The ordinance will be implemented in two phases starting in 2009. For the first phase, the ordinance requires new residential construction with low slope roofs to submit a checklist from Green Point, Green Communities, Green Built North Texas, LEED-Homes, or an approved equivalent standard. Effective October 1, 2009, for all commercial projects less than 50,000 square feet, all roof surfaces with a low slope must meet the EPA’s Energy Star low-slope roof requirements (an initial solar reflectance of 0.65 and an aged solar reflectance of 0.50).  For commercial projects over 50,000 square feet, phase 1 requires buildings to meet 85 percent of the points required under the appropriate LEED rating system for a certified level. Phase 2 will begin in 2011 and the requirements will become more stringent.